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Home » Products » Publications » Photosynthesis, water relations, and growth of planted Pinus strobus L. on burned sites in the southern Appalachians
 

Photosynthesis, water relations, and growth of planted Pinus strobus L. on burned sites in the southern Appalachians


We measured net photosynthesis,leaf conductance, xylem water potential, and growth of Pinus strbus L. seedlings two years after planting on two clear-cut and burned sites in the southern Appalachians. Multiple regression analysis was used to relate seedling net pholosynthesis to vapor pressure deficit, seedling crown temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), needle N. xylem water potential, and soil water, and to relate seedling size and growth to physiological measurements (average net photosynthesis, leaf conductance, and cumulative xylem water potential), soil water, needle N, seedling temperature, and PAR. Seedling net photosynthesis was significantly related to vapor pressure deficit, midday water potential, crown temperature, and PAR (r(2) = 0.70) early in the growing season (May 1992) with vapor pressure deficit alone explaining 42% of the variation. As neighboring vegetation developed, light became more limiting and significantly reduced seedling net photosynthesis later in the growing season (July, August. and September). Final seedling diameter was significantly related to competitor biomass. average photosynthetic rate, and needle N (r(2) = 0.68).

1994

Elliott, Katherine J.
Vose, James M.

Miscellaneous Publication

Tree Physiology 1994. 14.439-454. 16p.

Elliott, Katherine J.; Vose, James M. 1994. Photosynthesis, water relations, and growth of planted Pinus strobus L. on burned sites in the southern Appalachians. Tree Physiology 1994. 14.439-454. 16p.


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