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Soil CO2 flux in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen fertilization: patterns and methods


The evolution of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from soils is due to the metabolic activity of roots, mycorrhizae, and soil micro- and macro-organisms. Although precise estimates of carbon (C) recycled to the atmosphere from belowground sources are unavailable, Musselman and Fox (1991) propose that the belowground contribution exceeds 100 Pg y -1 globally. This represents a major component of C flux in the global C cycle. Belowground C cycling processes and subsequent soil CO 2 fluxes are equally important at ecosystem scales; however, we have limited knowledge of the magnitude of fluxes within and across ecosystems. Increased knowledge of the magnitude of C fluxes, as well as the factors which regulated these fluxes is critical for understanding ecosystem C cycling and potential responses to factors such as climatic change. In this study, we quantified soil CO 2 flux from soils growing ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa L.) Under conditions of elevated atmospheric CO 2 and soil nitrogen (N).

1995

Vose, James M.
Elliott, Katherine J.
Johnson, D.W.

Miscellaneous Publication

Advances In Soil Science: Soils and Global Change, p. 199-208

Vose, James M.; Elliott, Katherine J.; Johnson, D.W. 1995. Soil CO 2 flux in response to elevated atmospheric CO 2 and nitrogen fertilization: patterns and methods. Advances In Soil Science: Soils and Global Change, p. 199-208


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