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Forest Floor CO2 Flux From Two Contrasting Ecosystems in the Southern Appalachians


We measured forest floor CO 2 flux in two contrasting ecosystems (white pine plantation and northern hardwood ecosystems at low and high elevations, respectively) in May and September 1993 to quantify differences and determine factors regulating CO 2 fluxes. An automated IRGA based, flow through system was used with chambers inserted into the soil. This approach allowed quantification of diurnal flux patterns which were subsequently averaged to estimate daily mean flux rates ( mol m -2 s -1 ). Mean flux rates were 60 percent greater in the white pine ecosystem (8.9 mol m -2 s -1 ) than in the northern hardwood ecosystem (5.6 mol m -2 s -1 ). Across ecosystems and sample dates, the most important regulating factor was soil temperature (r 2 = 0.70; p 2 flux than factors more closely associated with the species composition and productivity of the sites (e.g., litter and root mass and quality).

1995

Vose, James M.
Clinton, Barton D.
Emrick, Verl

Miscellaneous Publication

In: USDA Forest Service Northeast Research Station General Technical Report NE-197, p. 165-170

Vose, James M.; Clinton, Barton D.; Emrick, Verl 1995. Forest Floor CO 2 Flux From Two Contrasting Ecosystems in the Southern Appalachians. In: USDA Forest Service Northeast Research Station General Technical Report NE-197, p. 165-170


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