"This USDA website will not be updated during a lapse in federal funding. Content on this website will not be current or maintained until funding issues have been resolved. However, if there is information that affects security, life, and property, this website will continue to update that information during a funding lapse."

 

Early successional forest habitats and water resources


Tree harvests that create early successional habitats have direct and indirect impacts on water resources in forests of the Central Hardwood Region. Streamflow increases substantially immediately after timber harvest, but increases decline as leaf area recovers and biomass aggrades. Post-harvest increases in stormflow of 10 20%, generally do not contribute to downstream flooding. Sediment from roads and skid trails can compromise water quality after cutting. With implementation of Best Management Practices (BMPs), timber harvests are unlikely to have detrimental impacts on water resources, but forest conversion from hardwood to pines, or poorly designed road networks may have long lasting impacts. Changing climate suggests the need for close monitoring of BMP effectiveness and the development of new BMPs applicable to more extreme climatic conditions.

2011

Vose, James M.
Ford, Chelcy R.

Miscellaneous Publication (MISC)

In: Greenberg, C.; Collins, B.; Thompson, F., III. editors. Sustaining Young Forest Communities. Springer Series: Managing Forest Ecosystems, Volume 21, Chapter 14, pp. 253-269. Springer, New York.

Vose, James M.; Ford, Chelcy R. 2011. Early successional forest habitats and water resources. In: Greenberg, C.; Collins, B.; Thompson, F., III. editors. Sustaining Young Forest Communities. Springer Series: Managing Forest Ecosystems, Volume 21, Chapter 14, pp. 253-269. Springer, New York.


Refine Search

 
Personal tools