"This USDA website will not be updated during a lapse in federal funding. Content on this website will not be current or maintained until funding issues have been resolved. However, if there is information that affects security, life, and property, this website will continue to update that information during a funding lapse."

Home » Products » Publications » Response and recovery of water yield and timing, stream sediment, abiotic parameters, and stream chemistry following logging
 

Response and recovery of water yield and timing, stream sediment, abiotic parameters, and stream chemistry following logging


Watershed ecosystem analysis provides a scientific approach to quantify and integrate resource responses to management (Hornbeck and Swank 1992) and also to address issues of resource sustainability (Christensen et. al. 1996). Philosophical components of the research approach at Coweeta are 1) the quantity, timing, and quality of streamflow provides an integrated measure of the successes or failure of land management practices and 2) response to disturbance provides a valuable tool for interpreting ecosystem behavior (Swank and Crossley 1988). Our objectives in this chapter are 1) to summarize and evaluate the long-term hydrologic and water quality responses to a forest management disturbance and 2) to link stream responses with process level research conducted within the watershed.

2014

Swank, Wayne T.
Knoepp, Jennifer D.
Vose, James M
Laseter, Stephanie N
Webster, Jackson R.

Book Chapter

In: Swank, Wayne T.; Webster, Jackson R., comps., eds. Long-term response of a forest watershed ecosystem. Clearcutting in the southern Appalachian. Oxford University Press: 36-56.

Swank, Wayne T.; Knoepp, Jennifer D.; Vose, James M.; Laseter, Stephanie N.; Webster, Jackson, R. 2014. Response and recovery of water yield and timing, stream sediment, abiotic parameters, and stream chemistry following logging. In: Swank, Wayne T.; Webster, Jackson R., comps., eds. Long-term response of a forest watershed ecosystem. Clearcutting in the southern Appalachian. Oxford University Press: 36-56.


Refine Search

 
Personal tools