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Soil and stream chemistry relationships in high elevation waters


High elevation watersheds in the southern Appalachian Mountains have unique soils and vegetation communities. They also receive greater inputs of acidic deposition as a result of increased precipitation compared to lower elevation sites.

2016

Knoepp, Jennifer
Elliott, Katherine J.
Jackson, William A.
Vose, James M.
Miniat, Chelcy Ford
Zarnoch, Stan

Proceedings - Paper (PR-P)

In: Stringer, Christina E.; Krauss, Ken W.; Latimer, James S., eds. 2016. Headwaters to estuaries: advances in watershed science and management -Proceedings of the Fifth Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds. March 2-5, 2015, North Charleston, South Carolina. e-General Technical Report SRS-211. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 302 p.

Knoepp, Jennifer; Elliott, Katherine J.; Jackson, William A.; Vose, James M.; Miniat, Chelcy Ford; Zarnoch, Stanley J. 2016. Soil and stream chemistry relationships in high elevation waters. In: Stringer, Christina E.; Krauss, Ken W.; Latimer, James S., eds. 2016. Headwaters to estuaries: advances in watershed science and management -Proceedings of the Fifth Interagency Conference on Research in the Watersheds. March 2-5, 2015, North Charleston, South Carolina. e-General Technical Report SRS-211. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 1 p.


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